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with the fiscal cliff. this deal will only get done by president obama and john boehner making a deal. they came close in the summer of 2011. the parties are so polarized and partisans polarized this is a problem. >> i keep saying we need a presidential historian or hostage negotiator. somebody could say we've been at stalemates before, gotten over it, shut down the government in '96. tip o'neill and ronald reagan managed to solve problems and get along. listen to what john mccain said about what we need here. >> it's time now to sit across the table from one another, rather than -- in the way they did with ronald reagan and the way you get things done in washington. >> the way they did with ronald reagan and get things done in washington. you sit together and figure it out. they were at a holiday party they didn't talk to each other. they're issuing sort of statements and rebuttals and saying i'm not going to budge. >> negotiation by press release. this is not how things get done in washington and part of the problem of the growing incivility in washington. people don't work together the way th
on tax hikes for the wealthy, this following president obama and speaker boehner's first phone call in days with both sides staying mum on the details. this afternoon president obama's fiscal photo-op off the day takes him to the suburban home of a middle class families in virginia, one of the thousands who responded to the
on tax hikes for the wealthy, this following president obama and speaker boehner's first phone
2008. >>> our fourth story, showdown. house speaker john boehner today gave president obama a taste of his own medicine, putting out his own proposal for avoiding the fiscal cliff. i spoke with tom coburn this hour and he said the deal boehner's put on the table is the best compromise out there. listen. >> i'm certain that if this is not good enough for the white house, we will go over the fiscal cliff. >> if you read though, the boehner proposal carefully, no tax rate increases, which we know is a nonstarter for the president. so where does that leave us? john avlon is here to help us read through the lines of the deal, also crunch some of those numbers. first, we're talking about the $800 billion figure. that's in the letter that john boehner wrote to the president. break that down for us. >> that's right. there is no numbers breaking that down. it's a where's the beef question. bumper sticker, we have the numbers but no details. boehner's aides will say that's where the negotiations come in. the devil's in the details. they'll say look, to achieve these revenue increases by closi
somewhere north of $1 trillion which is basically the difference between boehner's position and obama's position. it includes medicare cuts, entitlement cuts that are at least $400 billion. remember dick durbin on your show earlier in the week put that $400 billion marker down. democrats privately tell us they'll go higher, perhaps much higher if republicans get serious on raising taxes. they'll cut spending by about $1.2 trillion, which is the total of sequestration. and they'll probably have to throw in a debt limit increase to avoid hitting that in february. people involved in the talks feel like they can get there. there's no doubt it's going to take some time, boehner has to get republicans more comfortable with raising taxes including raising rates. i don't think there's a scenario where the rates don't go up on people making over $250,000. and democrats have to get more comfortable with entitlement changes. but at the end of the day, obama can deliver democrats. and i think boehner's stronger today than he was three months ago, and he could deliver more republicans than he coul
in the clip in the opening, president obama is insisting a balanced approach and we've talked about this before, balance is in the eye of the beholder. john boehner would say this is a balanced approach, we're putting revenue on the table as well as entitlement cuts. president obama seems to be indicating balance means getting more from the wealthy and likely to mean raising rates. as he said today and prior to today, the math doesn't add up if you simply close loopholes, cap deductions, do those sorts of things. we're sort of where we always have been. it's where we have been for several years at least when it relates to congress and the president simply not being able to resolve what are fundamental differences. we talked about this before the election, andrea. the election was supposed to tell us something about what the american public wanted. president obama did win the election. you know, an event has happened as part of the many months where the public comes down on this. >> luke russert, john boehner did yesterday come out with their proposal, the house proposal. is that a n
. boehner and the republicans have to be aware of where obama's at in his own head and with his colleagues, which is no deal without some increase in rates, or we go over the cliff. >> let me just add one thing. when obama made that initial offer, we talked a little bit about how, you know, it was a wish list. it was ideological, whatever you want to say. i think it actually helped boehner in some respects because it gave him three or four things that he could then go back to his caucus and say, look, i moved obama off of this, this and this. and when boehner put his offer out there, you started to see what could potentially be a chip-trading process going on here, whereby you have some give on, you know, cpi, the inflation index for social security, and in exchange boehner would agree to some marginal rate in the tax rates. now the people need to start figuring out what they want to give and take. >> the only difference i would say, steve, between what the president wants and john boehner is it's not what john boehner wants. it's what john boehner can deliver. >> yeah. >> and this is a si
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7